What Lib Dem MPs will be reading this summer

by Stephen Tall on July 2, 2007

We’re into July, yet summer seems to have decided to give the UK a miss this year (so far). No matter.

Packing books for the beach (or wherever) is as much a summer ritual as the Brits crashing out of Wimbledon, and helping out in the latest Parliamentary by-elections. So Lib Dem Voice asked a few of the party’s MPs which books they’d be taking with them on holiday this year. Here’s what they told us:

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Colin Breed MP:
Isaac Foot by Michael Foot & Alison Hignet;
After the Victorians by A.N. Wilson;
Sea Music by Sara MacDonald.

Annette Brooke MP:
William Wilberforce by William Hague;
Happiness by Richard Layard;
Half Of A Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

Lorely Burt MP:
A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khalid Hosseini.

John Hemming MP
The Gulag of the Family Courts by Jack Frost;
Foundation and Earth by Isaac Azimov.

Chris Huhne MP:
The meaning of the 21st century: a vital blueprint for ensuring our future by James Martin;
The Mission Song by John Le Carre;
Peacemakers. Six months that changed the world: the Paris peace conference of 1919 and its attempt to end war by Margaret Macmillan

John Leech MP:
When I go on holiday, politics is the last thing on my mind. I will not be reading anything political. I intend to read a couple of Wilbur Smith novels that I bought second hand from a school Christmas fair (Shout at the Devil and Goldmine).

John Pugh MP:
Immortality by Milan Kundera – best novel I’ve read in last 20 years;
44 Scotland Street by Alexander McCall-Smith – v. amusing;
Anarchy, State and Utopia by Robert Nozick – thought provoking.

Jo Swinson MP:
The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde – fabulous fiction for book-lovers, with plenty of in-jokes from literature through the ages!;
Happiness: Lessons from a new science by Richard Layard – a thought-provoking take on political priorities;
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by JK Rowling – if it is anything like the previous six, it will be highly addictive and a must-read.