Posts Tagged “ofsted”

It’s Laws v Gove again as Lib Dem schools minister says academy chains should be accountable to Ofsted

by Stephen Tall on February 6, 2014

‘It’s civil war in the Coalition classroom’ – that’s how the Independent bills the latest row between those two very civil politicians running the education department, Conservative secretary of state Michael Gove and Lib Dem schools minister David Laws. I wrote at the weekend about the first spat, which erupted after Michael Gove’s decision to […]

Gove and Laws scrap it out on front pages over sacking of Ofsted head. Here’s what the row is all about.

by Stephen Tall on February 2, 2014

Today’s newspaper front pages are full of the scrap taking place at the heart of the Department for Education between Conservative secretary of state Michael Gove and Lib Dem schools minister David Laws: Ofsted row: Lib Dems furious at Conservative plan to ‘politicise’ classrooms (Independent on Sunday) Lib Dems savage Gove over sacked schools boss […]

The Daily Mail, that Ofsted report, and setting for pupils: what does the evidence say?

by Stephen Tall on June 13, 2013

It’s my own fault, I know, for looking at the Daily Mail: Put pupils in sets at 11 to help brightest, says Ofsted: Call for pupils to be separated to make sure top students don’t slip back academically Pretty definitive, (…)

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Clegg says no to childcare ratio changes. My question is: why’s it the Government’s job to dictate them?

by Stephen Tall on June 6, 2013

Nick Clegg’s statement is categorical — the Coalition is abandoning plans to allow nurseries and childminders in England to look after more children. Revealed in January by Conservative children’s minister Liz Truss, the idea that the ratio for under 2s, for example, could increase from 1:4 to 1:6 was always going to be controversial. Here’s […]

The pupil premium isn’t a quick-fix solution, it’s a long-haul policy

by Stephen Tall on September 20, 2012

The pupil premium — additional cash targeted at the most disadvantaged children — is the policy of which Nick Clegg is proudest and with which he is most closely associated. The policy itself dates back to Julian le Grand in the 1980s (when it was touted as a progressive version of school vouchers) but it […]