Labour U-turns on non-doms as Lib Dem’s Oakeshott wins battle

by Stephen Tall on February 1, 2010

Glad tidings from the House of Lords today, where Labour has – at long, long last – bowed to Lib Dem pressure and announced that non-doms will no longer be able to sit in Parliament.
The party’s terrier-like Treasury spokesman Lord (Matthew) Oakeshott has welcomed the Government’s announcement:
I have introduced 4 bills over the last 5 […]

LDV doesn’t do statporn, but if we did (Jan. ‘10)

by Stephen Tall on February 1, 2010

… We’d say a big thank you to the 38,593 ‘absolute unique visitors’* who read Liberal Democrat Voice in January.
That’s a big jump, unsurprisingly, compared to our December ‘09 figure of c.28,000 – and is up some 60% on the equivalent figure for January ‘09 of c.24,000.
This brings our absolute unique visitor readership for the […]

Vince: “Labour and the Tories are accusing each other of being confused and contradictory on the economy, and they’re both right.”

by Stephen Tall on February 1, 2010

Attack is the best form of defence, I guess, so it’s no surprise that the Tories – seriously on the back-foot since it became clear that David Cameron and George Osborne haven’t got a clue what they plan to do about the deficit – have launched a broadside against Labour. With Peter Mandelson using a […]

Ashcroft’s tax status: Tory leadership “evasive and obfuscatory”

by Stephen Tall on February 1, 2010

Today’s Guardian reports:
The Conservative leadership is today accused of being “evasive and obfuscatory” over the tax status of Lord Ashcroft, the party’s deputy chairman and biggest donor, in a ruling by the information commissioner that sharply criticises the secrecy over where he is resident for tax purposes.
The Cabinet Office has been ordered to reveal within […]

Daily View 2×2: 1 February 2010

by Stephen Tall on February 1, 2010

Happy Monday morning, everyone. And, yes, January really is over: hurrah! So let’s salute the first day of February by recalling that this is the day (in 1884) when the Oxford English Dictionary was born; as were Clarke Gable (1901) and Boris Yeltsin (1931). Sadly the world lost Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley; but that was 159 […]