Those Lib Dem donation figures in full (Q3, 2009)

by Stephen Tall on November 30, 2009

The Electoral Commission has published the latest donation and borrowing figures for the political parties this week, and its website allow us to gain a picture of the Lib Dems’ fundraising efforts over the years. Below is the full breakdown of cash and non-cash donations received by quarter since 2005, and annually between 2001 and 2004.

Lots of familiar names on the 2009 Q3 list, with five/six-figure gifts coming from the following: Joseph Rowntree Reform Trust (£231k), Bloomberg Tradebook Europe Limited (£25k), Mr Christopher Nicholson (£21.5k), Professor John Howson (£10k), Mrs Joan Ramsden (£10k), and Philip Young (£10k).

Fewer Parliamentarians than normal contributed this quarter – the most generous I spot-checked were: Alan Reid MP (£10.85k), Lord Goodhart (£3.4k), Chris Huhne (£3.4k), Lord Roberts of Llandudno (£3.3k), Diana Wallis (£2.5k), Lord Watson of Richmond (£2.5k), Annette Brooke (£2.1k), and Andrew Duff MEP (£2k). I also see former London mayoral hopeful Brian Paddick gave £1.5k, while Norwich North by-election candidate April Pond contributed £1.85k.

Since 2004 – and most notably in 2005, with that Michael Brown donation – the party’s annual donations have never dipped below £2m. The trend continues again in 2009, with some £2.6m received this year to date – that’s more than was raised in the entire 2008. Indeed, 2009’s third quarter donations of £748k were the largest this Parliament – beating even 2007’s figures, the year of the election-that-never-was. Impressive stuff, at least comparatively speaking.

I say compararatively speaking … to date in 2009, the Tories have received approaching £14m in cash donations, and the Labour party approaching £10m. Think about those figures for a moment. The Tories have raised more than five times as much as the Lib Dems this year, Labour some four times as much. And this year is no one-off: the same thing happens each and every year to varying degrees. And yet, despite this massive disparity, the Lib Dems regularly poll more than one-fifth of votes in national elections. It is, actually and genuinely, a pretty remarkable achievement.

Here are the full Lib Dem donation figures, 2001-09:

2009, Q1 = £790,075
2009, Q2 = £1,088,083
2009, Q3 = £747,658
2009 (to date) = £2,625,816

2008, Q1 = £385,931
2008, Q2 = £635,435
2008, Q3 = £519,823
2008, Q4 = £875,611
2008 = £2,416,800

2007, Q1 = £607,457
2007, Q2 = £631,451
2007, Q3 = £731,364
2007, Q4 = £853,387
2007 = £2,823,659

2006, Q1 = £219,915
2006, Q2 = £233,669
2006, Q3 = £571,715
2006, Q4 = £1,643,859
2006 = £2,669,158

2005, Q1 = £3,709,897
2005, Q2 = £713,656
2005, Q3 = £174,751
2005, Q4 = £317,188
2005 = £4,915,492

2004 = £2,374,319

2003 = £1,223,135

2002 = £618,783

2001 = £1,052,010