Daily View 2×2: 5 June 2009

by Stephen Tall on June 5, 2009

Let me let you into the hidden secret of the LDV Daily View – it’s usually written very late the night before, ready to go live at the crack of dawn for your breakfast pleasure. This poses a problem when, as I am now, you’re writing at gone midnight not knowing whether Gordon Brown will have anyone left in his cabinet by the time you, dear gentle reader, are pouring milk over your cereal. But here goes…

2 Big Stories

James Purnell quits cabinet: is this the end of Gordon Brown’s premiership?
The resignation of the work and pensions secretary was a bolt from the blue – its unexpectedness exposed the fragility of the prime minister’s dwindling authority. Rumours circulated that Mr Purnell would be followed by close (Blairite) colleagues David Miliband and Andy Burnham – but they, and subsequently John Hutton and Phil Woolas, have now all pledged their fealty. So where next? This looks to me like the end-of-the-road for Mr Brown, but frankly no-one can second-guess the next twist in this farce. Mr Brown’s administration is starting to make John Major’s look competent.

Local election results due throughout Friday
Though we’ll have to wait ’til Sunday to hear about the European elections, Friday will see the declaration of all the local elections taking place in English county/unitary councils and the three mayoral contests. It’s going to be a long day, but LDV will bring you all the results as they come in. The first reports I’ve seen of turn-out suggest it’s not been high, probably around 30 per cent. This might be a case of voters shunning politics in the wake of the MPs’ expenses scandal – or it might just be that in 2004, the Euros coincided with pretty much nationwide local elections, boosting turnout.

2 must-read blog posts

Alan Johnson could be Cameron’s worst nightmare (Mark Reckons)

… worst of all from Mr Cameron’s perspective, Mr Johnson is the man most likely to campaign for and put on the ballot paper at the next General Election, a referendum on a proportional electoral system. Mr Johnson is a long term advocate of change and in the wake of the expenses scandal that has rocked the political class there is a very strong case for putting this to the electorate and letting them decide. Then, even if Cameron becomes Prime Minister, assuming the referendum passed he would be constitutionally bound to change the system for the following General Election.


Pity the poor politicians with a hypocritical public
(‘Costigan Quist’)

Whenever you see a politician or party doing something evasive or dishonest, consider that they’re doing it because they think more people will vote for them if they do, and the evidence tells us they’re probably right.